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The Lord of The Dance

The journey back home to God is never easy. Often our actions can be misread and even misunderstood. In the story this week David is so excited and overwhelmed at the presence of the creator God among his people, that he dances with joy discarding his kingly robes in the presence of the one who is over all and King of all. His actions are misunderstood by his wife Michal. She confronts David suggesting that his dancing is undignified for a king. If Michal was a Glaswegian she would have called David an eejit! (See 2 Samuel 6: 12-16).

However Michal’s rebuke doesn’t deter David, he actually writes a psalm about his experience. It is this psalm that we in the Church of Scotland sing on Communion Sundays. Such is the energy of the psalm that dancing would not be out of place. So would you dance in church on Communion Sunday?

Perhaps we need to be willing to be fools for God. Too often our worship and expressions of gratitude are so tame that we run the risk of missing the joy and gladness that can only be encountered when we take the risk and express our gratitude to God in an extravagant way.

 

Mind blowing God

Creator of the worlds

Forgive our self importance

Standing on ceremony

Thinking we are what we’re not

And not recognising who you are

The one who is seeking to redeem

And restore our broken lives

 

Your glory wakens us up with a jolt

We stand in awe of your omnipotence 

Now we do look silly 

Like shabby hoboes 

We bow our heads in reverence and humility

Our hearts beating faster

Waiting

Wondering 

Longing

 

Then your Glory passes by

And we are changed

We dare to dance a jig 

Even in the face of those who cannot see the light

Or hear the music

We’ll dance a jig in Church tonight 

And dance the devil out

Psalm 24

1 The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it,
    the world, and those who live in it;
2 for he has founded it on the seas,
    and established it on the rivers.

3 Who shall ascend the hill of the Lord?
    And who shall stand in his holy place?
4 Those who have clean hands and pure hearts,
    who do not lift up their souls to what is false,
    and do not swear deceitfully.
5 They will receive blessing from the Lord,
    and vindication from the God of their salvation.
6 Such is the company of those who seek him,
    who seek the face of the God of Jacob. Selah

7 Lift up your heads, O gates!
    and be lifted up, O ancient doors!
    that the King of glory may come in.
8 Who is the King of glory?
    The Lord, strong and mighty,
    the Lord, mighty in battle.
9 Lift up your heads, O gates!
    and be lifted up, O ancient doors!
    that the King of glory may come in.
10 Who is this King of glory?
    The Lord of hosts,
    he is the King of glory.Selah

 
Comments

By Anne, 6 months ago

I agree. There is far too much solemnity & an over-abundance of dreary hymns in minor keys, particularly at the opening of our services. We need to come before the Lord with praise & thanksgiving in our hearts, raising the roofs & warming the walls with our worship. This is the King of Glory we honour - let’s express that with freedom & joy. Let’s be ‘eejits for God’.

By Marion Murray, 6 months ago

I would indeed dance at communion.  perhaps the office bearers could lead the congregation in this on the way back with the elements. What about a time to move around when offering the peace of the lord to others. I also agree that the hymn choice has a bearing on how we can rejoice and give thanks fo all that we have received in Christ laying down his life for us.

By JamesC, about 6 months ago

Thanks for your comments. I love the idea of office bearers leading the dance, let’s be eejits for God - Amen!






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